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‘It took me 12 years to get that money,’ says Chase customer who lost $160k savings – only for bank to blame it on her

A CALIFORNIA woman has shared how she got scammed out of her life savings through a simple but deceptive text message scheme...READ THE FULL ORIGINAL ARTICLE HERE▶▶

Deborah Moss went public with the fraudulent theft after seeking to resolve the issue with her bank, Chase, and being told that the funds would not be returned to her.

Deborah Moss was scammed out of over $160,000 when scammers tricked her into helping them access her Chase Bank account
Deborah Moss was scammed out of over $160,000 when scammers tricked her into helping them access her Chase Bank account
Moss said she filed a claim with the police and the bank, but bank officials told her that they could not refund the money because she did not take adequate precautions to protect herself
Moss said she filed a claim with the police and the bank, but bank officials told her that they could not refund the money because she did not take adequate precautions to protect herself

Moss, who owns a small catering business, spent over ten years growing her company and savings before recently moving to a quieter home in Guerneville, California.

Everything was going well in her new home until she received a strange text message about an “unauthorized $35 debit card charge from another state,” Moss said during an interview with CBS News.

Moss was asked to text back to confirm the charge, and when she replied that it was not authorized, she soon received a call back from a number whose caller ID came up as “Chase Bank.”

She then spoke on the phone with a woman who said she was from the bank, Miss Barbara.

Miss Barbara told Moss that she would issue her a new debit card to protect against any future fraudulent activity but that to do that, Moss would need to confirm her identity by reading off the series of numbers that Miss Barbara would send Moss via text.

Moss said that she thought everything was fine until Miss Barbara had to call back day after day to request more confirmation numbers because of different problems delivering the new card to Moss’s remote address.

Eventually, Moss decided to visit her local Chase Bank branch in person to sort out the issue, and only there did she learn that her accounts had been emptied of over $160,000 and that she now owed the bank over $800.

In just a week, the scammers moved money out of her account six times, with one amount as big as $48,000.

“That was all my money,” she said. “It took me 12 years to get that money, and that was my life savings.”

Even though Moss went to the police and followed all the necessary claim procedures at the bank, Moss said that officials have not been able to help her get her money back.

The bank representatives allegedly told her that her money had been wired out of her accounts and that the numbers she had read to them were the confirmation codes they needed to complete the transactions.

But Chase Bank has said that there is little they can do about scams like this, Moss said.

“During our review, we found you didn’t do enough to keep your account safe from theft or unauthorized use,” the bank wrote to Moss in a letter.

The bank told CBS they tried to warn Moss about what was happening to her account, but she didn’t answer.

Moss said she never got any calls or texts.

“You think of your bank as being someplace that you put your money so that it’s safe but it’s not safe,” said Moss.

It needs to change.”

To protect their accounts, Chase suggests that consumers:

  • Avoid sharing ATM pins and passcodes.
  • Remember that banks don’t normally reach out via phone calls.
  • Avoid clicking on suspicious links sent via texts and emails.

The U.S. Sun has reached out to Chase Bank for comments.

About the author

Kylian Walterlin

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