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You can give UPND 100 years, nothing will change – Silavwe

GOLDEN Party of Zambia president Jackson Silavwe has accused UPND of being preoccupied with what they can siphon from state coffers to benefit their own pockets...READ THE FULL ORIGINAL ARTICLE HERE▶▶

“You can give them 100 years and nothing will change,” he said. “Their attitude speaks louder than any speech or economic graph.”

Silavwe added that UPND lacks the moral campus to lead people out of poverty.

“A party in government that behaves like this towards it’s own state it leads can never bring economic prosperity to all the citizens. You can give them a 100 years and nothing will change,” he said in his reaction to the state awarding Lusaka UPND chairman Obvious Mwaliteta K900,000 compensation for false imprisonment. “The UPND is preoccupied with what they can siphon from the state coffers to benefit their own pockets and not harnessing the state to benefit all the Zambians.”

Silavwe said no legal justification can make what is happening right.

“This is plunder 101. Even slave trade was very legal but immoral. No amount of legal justification by Attorney General [Mulilo] Kabesha can make this right,” wrote Silavwe on his Facebook wall. “UPND lacks the moral campus to lead our people out of poverty and squalor compounded by the current high cost of living. Their attitude speaks louder than any speech or economic graph. At this rate, UPND cannot be entrusted to soberly manage our state coffers. They must be stopped.”

According to a consent judgment signed by High Court judge Charles Kafunda, the Attorney General also agreed to pay Mwaliteta and Kafue businessman James Sichomba K200,000 in legal fees.

“By consent of the parties through their respective advocates, it is hereby agreed and ordered as follows; that the defendant (AG) shall pay the plaintiffs the sum of K900,000 each as damages. That the defendant (AG) shall pay the sum of K200,000 legal fees as costs. That the above shall be full and final settlement of all the claims in this matter,” read the consent order signed on March 2, 2023

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Kylian Walterlin

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